McDowell House at Quaker Meadows

Description

On September 30, 1780, about one thousand militiamen from the Overmountain region (today's East Tennessee and Southwest Virginia) marched into Quaker Meadows to gather with 350 militiamen from Surry and Wilkes counties, North Carolina. Quaker Meadows was the home of Colonel Charles MCDowell and his brother Major Joseph McDowell.

Charles McDowell, Jr., son of Colonel McDowell, built this house in 1812. Nothing remains of the colonel's house which was nearby in 1780. It is believed to have sat at the north end of what is today the golf course.

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McDowell House at Quaker Meadows

Photo by Randell Jones

Charles McDowell built this house in 1812. Nothing remains of his house which was present in 1780 during the campaign to what became the Battle of Kings Mountain. That earlier house is believed to have stood at the northwest corner of what is today the golf course. [View Additional File Details]

Wayside exhibit: A Patriot Army Grows

Photo by Randell Jones

A Patriot Army Grows (Summary) On September 30, 1780, about one thousand militiamen from the Overmountain region (today's northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia) gathered at Quaker Meadows with 350 militiamen from Surry and Wilkes counties, North Carolina. The officers met beneath the Council Oak to discuss plans for pursuing British Major Patrick Ferguson and his loyalist army. Quaker Meadows was the home of Colonel Charles McDowell, commander of the Burke County Militia, and his brother Major Joseph McDowell. [View Additional File Details]

Celebration at McDowell House at Quaker Meadows

Photos by Randell Jones

Each fall on the weekend near September 30, Historic Burke Foundation hosts family-friendly Revolutionary War Weekend celebration at the McDowell House with the participation of the Overmountain Victory Trail Association, the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail (NPS), and local community groups and living history reenactors. The Guilford Courthouse Fife and Drum Corps is shown performing. [View Additional File Details]

Excerpts from "Before They Were Heroes at King's Mountain" by Randell Jones

pp. 397-398 On September 30, the separated parties of Overmountain militia proceeded toward their rendezvous along the Catawba River. . . . They arrived at the homes of Charles McDowell and Joseph McDowell that evening. By then, the two militia groups had covered 31 miles and 23 miles that day, with each having covered 15 miles the day before, after leaving Cathey's Plantation. The men were in need of rest. Major Joseph McDowell welcomed them to this home at Quaker Meadows, encouraging the men to use his dry rail fencing as kindling for their cooking fires. Their spirits were lifted further upon the arrival of Colonel Benjamin Cleaveland and Major Joseph Winton in command of 350 men from Wilkes and Surry counties, including "Cleaveland's Bulldogs." Copyright 2011, Randell Jones Available at www.danielboonefootsteps.com [View Additional File Details]

Cite this Page

Randell Jones, A Guide to the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, “McDowell House at Quaker Meadows,” Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, accessed July 22, 2017, http:/​/​bythewaywebf.​webfactional.​com/​omvt/​items/​show/​7.​
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