Excerpts from "Before They Were Heroes at King's Mountain" by Randell Jones


This file appears in: Greenlee Ford and the Catawba River

pp. 488-489
The prisoners had been on a forced march for eight days with little food. The Patriot militiamen had beaten some and executed others. The prisoners' prospects for survival did not look good to them. {Lt. Anthony} Allaire took note of the outcome of this turn in the prisoners' attitude. He wrote on the 15th, "About one hundred prisoners made their escape on this march." {Dr. Uzal} Johnson estimated fewer but emphasized the prisoners' desperate condition. He wrote that "thirty-odd of the Prisoners made their escape on this March, tho very much fatigued and all most famished with hunger, having no Meat for three Days."

The plight of the Patriot militiamen was not much different that day. "We set off early next morning," wrote Benjamin Sharp, "and shortly after the rain began to fall in torrents and continued the whole day." They quickened their march, wanting to cross the Catawba River before it became impassible. Perhaps such an urgent and demanding pace in such disagreeable weather enabled so many prisoners to slip off into the woods. In any case, the party marched 32 miles, crossing the Catawba River near midnight and discovering the next morning that it had become swollen beyond passage. They felt secure from Tarleton's pursuit, if, in fact, he had been riding after them. They stopped at Quaker Meadows, and Major McDowell rode along the line welcoming the men, telling them this was his plantation, and inviting them to use the rail fencing to build fires. "I suppose everyone felt grateful for this generous offer, " wrote [Benjamin] Sharp, "for it was rather cold, being the last of October, and every one, from the Commander-in-Chief to the meanest private, was as wet as if he had just been dragged through the Catawba River."

Copyright 2011, Randell Jones
Available at www.danielboonefootsteps.com


This file appears in: Greenlee Ford and the Catawba River

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Excerpts from "Before They Were Heroes at King's Mountain" by Randell Jones

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pp. 488-489
The prisoners had been on a forced march for eight days with little food. The Patriot militiamen had beaten some and executed others. The prisoners' prospects for survival did not look good to them. {Lt. Anthony} Allaire took note of the outcome of this turn in the prisoners' attitude. He wrote on the 15th, "About one hundred prisoners made their escape on this march." {Dr. Uzal} Johnson estimated fewer but emphasized the prisoners' desperate condition. He wrote that "thirty-odd of the Prisoners made their escape on this March, tho very much fatigued and all most famished with hunger, having no Meat for three Days."

The plight of the Patriot militiamen was not much different that day. "We set off early next morning," wrote Benjamin Sharp, "and shortly after the rain began to fall in torrents and continued the whole day." They quickened their march, wanting to cross the Catawba River before it became impassible. Perhaps such an urgent and demanding pace in such disagreeable weather enabled so many prisoners to slip off into the woods. In any case, the party marched 32 miles, crossing the Catawba River near midnight and discovering the next morning that it had become swollen beyond passage. They felt secure from Tarleton's pursuit, if, in fact, he had been riding after them. They stopped at Quaker Meadows, and Major McDowell rode along the line welcoming the men, telling them this was his plantation, and inviting them to use the rail fencing to build fires. "I suppose everyone felt grateful for this generous offer, " wrote [Benjamin] Sharp, "for it was rather cold, being the last of October, and every one, from the Commander-in-Chief to the meanest private, was as wet as if he had just been dragged through the Catawba River."

Copyright 2011, Randell Jones
Available at www.danielboonefootsteps.com

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This file appears in: Greenlee Ford and the Catawba River