Excerpts from "Before They Were Heroes at King's Mountain" by Randell Jones


This file appears in: The Cowpens

pp 437-8
The same evening, another spy returned with more immediately useful information. Joseph Kerr, as part of the South Carolina command and a month shy of his 20th birthday, had left Flint Hill a day or two before, seeking the whereabouts of Patrick Ferguson and his army of British Legion and Tory militiamen. ... Kerr found Ferguson's camp at midday on the 6th on the plantation of Peter Quinn, some six or seven miles from Little King's Mountain. Pretending to be a loyalist looking to take protection under the major, he made his way into the camp. He easily succeeded in this ruse because this area was full of Loyalists, and because Ferguson was eager to gather more militiamen to his ranks. Moveover, Kerr was a generally amiable person, but suffering some disability since birth, his physical condition disarmed the Tories of their caution He circulated freely among the men at camp, cajoling with them, feigning praise for the Crown, and asking seemingly innocuous . He played the part perfectly, showing great interest and delight in hearing about recent British successes and, most important, Ferguson's immediate plans. Timing his departure carefully, the shrewd spy shrank back form the encampment and faded from their attention. He then made his way back toward the Patriot militiamen, whom he knew were on the move.

Copyright 2011, Randell Jones
Available at www.danielboonefootsteps.com


This file appears in: The Cowpens

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Excerpts from "Before They Were Heroes at King's Mountain" by Randell Jones

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pp 437-8
The same evening, another spy returned with more immediately useful information. Joseph Kerr, as part of the South Carolina command and a month shy of his 20th birthday, had left Flint Hill a day or two before, seeking the whereabouts of Patrick Ferguson and his army of British Legion and Tory militiamen. ... Kerr found Ferguson's camp at midday on the 6th on the plantation of Peter Quinn, some six or seven miles from Little King's Mountain. Pretending to be a loyalist looking to take protection under the major, he made his way into the camp. He easily succeeded in this ruse because this area was full of Loyalists, and because Ferguson was eager to gather more militiamen to his ranks. Moveover, Kerr was a generally amiable person, but suffering some disability since birth, his physical condition disarmed the Tories of their caution He circulated freely among the men at camp, cajoling with them, feigning praise for the Crown, and asking seemingly innocuous . He played the part perfectly, showing great interest and delight in hearing about recent British successes and, most important, Ferguson's immediate plans. Timing his departure carefully, the shrewd spy shrank back form the encampment and faded from their attention. He then made his way back toward the Patriot militiamen, whom he knew were on the move.

Copyright 2011, Randell Jones
Available at www.danielboonefootsteps.com

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This file appears in: The Cowpens